What: All Issues : Environment : Encouragement of Walking and Bicycling as Alternative Means of Transportation : HR 3. Surface Transportation Reauthorization/Vote to Instruct the Secretary of Transportation to Improve and Expand Upon Pedestrian and Bicycle Pathways in Dangerous Areas of the Nation's Transportation Infrastructure. (2005 senate Roll Call 121)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

HR 3. Surface Transportation Reauthorization/Vote to Instruct the Secretary of Transportation to Improve and Expand Upon Pedestrian and Bicycle Pathways in Dangerous Areas of the Nation's Transportation Infrastructure.
senate Roll Call 121     May 11, 2005
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

In 2003, nearly 5,000 pedestrians and more than 600 bicyclists were killed in the U.S. To be sure, in many areas of the country the transportation system has been engineered in a dangerous way for nonmotorized travelers such as pedestrians and bicyclists. During debate on legislation to reauthorize congressional spending priorities in the area of surface transportation, Senator Harkin (D-IA) offered an amendment which would have directed the Secretary of Transportation to improve and expand upon pedestrian and bicycle pathways to reduce the number of accidents involving pedestrians and bicyclists. Harkin also explained that his amendment "requires each State to adopt a 'complete streets' policy to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians by ensuring that all users are considered when communities are built or modernized." Progressives supported Harkin's amendment as a way to reduce injuries involving pedestrians and bicyclists and to provide a viable alternative to automobiles as a means of transportation. Conservatives voted against the Harkin amendment and argued that pedestrians and bicycles should not be considered in the context of a transportation spending bill. Senator Bond (R-MO) expressed this view succinctly: "This is not a bill for bicycles and pedestrians." On a vote of 44-53, the Harkin amendment was rejected and the Secretary of Transportation was not instructed to improve and expand upon pedestrian and bicycle pathways in dangerous areas of the nation's transportation infrastructure.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name