What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : Tax Breaks for the Rich : H Con Res 353. 2003 Budget Resolution/Vote to Table (Kill) an Effort to Prevent Consideration of the Budget Resolution, Which Makes Permanent Pervious Year's Temporary Tax Cuts, Until Democratic Amendments Were Allowed in the Debate. (2002 house Roll Call 76)
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H Con Res 353. 2003 Budget Resolution/Vote to Table (Kill) an Effort to Prevent Consideration of the Budget Resolution, Which Makes Permanent Pervious Year's Temporary Tax Cuts, Until Democratic Amendments Were Allowed in the Debate.
house Roll Call 76     Mar 20, 2002
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

The first budgeting step for the federal government is passage of the budget resolution, a non-binding document that sets out broad spending and revenue totals for the coming year. The Republicans proposed a resolution for 2003 that devoted $353 billion to making permanent the previous year's temporary tax cuts, and that kept the government within strict spending limits. As with most legislation in the House, this budget resolution came with a corresponding resolution establishing the rules for debate on the measure. Opponents of a bill will usually oppose the bill's rule, because if the rule fails to pass the bill also dies. Progressives disliked both the tax cut and the spending limits in the Republican budget resolution, so they also opposed the rule. They were particularly opposed to the rule because it prevented them from amending the budget resolution in debate. Republicans had won an important victory on the rule when they won a motion for the previous question (see vote 75), a way of ending debate on the rule and calling it up for a vote. Defeating a previous motion question essentially turns debate on an issue over to opponents. Slaughter (D-NY) moved to reconsider this motion for the previous question, but Goss (RFL) countered with a motion to table (kill) Slaughter's motion. Progressives opposed Goss's motion to table because they supported Slaughter's motion to reconsider, opposed the previous question motion (and wanted another chance to vote it down), and opposed the rule which was the current matter for debate. In short, this elaborate series of parliamentary maneuvers all related to passing the rule, which was itself a stand-in for the budget resolution. Progressives voted "no" on Goss's motion to table, but they lost 222-206.

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