What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : Tax Breaks for the Rich : S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Grassley of Iowa amendment that would provide for legislation preventing the Alternative Minimum Tax from applying to certain taxpayers through 2014/On agreeing to the amendment (2009 senate Roll Call 139)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Grassley of Iowa amendment that would provide for legislation preventing the Alternative Minimum Tax from applying to certain taxpayers through 2014/On agreeing to the amendment
senate Roll Call 139     Apr 02, 2009
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote was on an amendment by Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, that would adjust the budget resolution to allow for future legislation preventing the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) from applying to certain middle-class taxpayers through fiscal 2014.  The amendment was offered to the budget resolution that serves as the blueprint for Congress’ budget priorities in fiscal 2010.  The budget resolution sets overall spending targets for the Appropriations committees and outlines other budget rules.

The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) was originally designed to capture taxes from very wealthy citizens who were able to use loopholes to avoid most of their tax burden.  However because it hasn’t been adjusted for inflation, more and more middle class Americans are being subjected to it.  

Grassley said the underlying budget resolution would “patch” the AMT through 2012; his amendment would extend that through 2014.

“This would provide tax relief to 18 million families at a cost of $114 billion. This patch is essential to honest budgeting because we all know that the AMT will eventually pass without being patched. This amendment also helps families plan their financial affairs properly, rather than leave them guessing as to what their future tax burden will be. Also, by giving greater stability to this area of the tax law, tax professionals will administer the law better, leading to better compliance and a smaller tax gap,” Grassley said.

Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said the resolution already has “three full years of Alternative Minimum Tax protection.”

“We have never had that much before in any resolution. The amendment of the Senator would add $117 billion to the debt,” Conrad said.

The amendment was rejected by a vote of 40-58.  All but one Democrat present voted against the amendment.  Of Republicans present, all but two voted for the amendment.  The end result is that the bill went forward without language that would have extended taxpayer protections from the AMT for an additional two years.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name