What: All Issues : Labor Rights : Preventing Workers' Rights From Being Eroded by International Trade Agreements : (H.R. 847, H.R. 2701, H.R. 2378) Legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to all three bills (2010 house Roll Call 548)
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(H.R. 847, H.R. 2701, H.R. 2378) Legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to all three bills
house Roll Call 548     Sep 29, 2010
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Win

This was a vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to three separate bills. Those three bills included H.R. 847, which established a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; H.R. 2701, a bill, which authorized annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; and H.R. 2378, which enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) urged support for the resolution and the 9/11 rescue workers health bill: “The attacks caused all kinds of terrible health problems that are unique to 9/11. 9/11 responders have received a lot of awards and praise, but what they tell me is what they really need is their health care. And this bill provides health care to all who need it--monitoring for those who were exposed to the deadly toxins, and assistance for the survivors of the attacks.”

Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-NY) urged support for the intelligence bill: “I know that the intelligence community is the first line of defense against terrorists, proliferators of weapons of mass destruction, and other rogue elements who wish to do us harm here at home and across the globe. This legislation… is an opportunity for the Congress to guide the 16 agencies of the intelligence community [these include the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), etc.] while making significant strides in improving oversight of the intelligence community.”

H.R. 2378, which enabled the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies, attracted bipartisan support. Rep. Don Manzullo (R-IL) urged support for that bill: “This legislation provides another weapon in our trade arsenal to empower trade enforcement officials to confront unfair trade practices by China and others. If you want to stop Chinese imports coming in at predatory prices and give our manufacturers and farmers the chance to fairly compete, then support the currency reform bill.”

Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL) argued the intelligence bill omitted Republican-backed policies, including a prohibition on using intelligence funding to bring prisoners from Guantanamo [the detention facility where the U.S. government had held suspected terrorists] to the United States. He also criticized the Democrats for omitting a Republican-supported provision that prohibited the granting of Miranda rights [the rights that police officers must explain to criminal suspects in the United States, such as the “right to remain silent”] to suspected terrorists. Diaz-Balart said: “The underlying bill contains changes [from the original House bill, which included the prohibitions described above] that were negotiated with no House Republican input....the majority wishes to rush to the exit to be back in their districts campaigning, but we should not pass a bill that hurts the intelligence community in the process.”

The House agreed to the resolution by a vote of 234-183. 233 Democrats and 1 Republican voted “yea.” 169 Republicans and 14 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to formal floor debate on legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies. The intelligence bill had already passed the Senate. Thus, House passage cleared the measure for President Obama’s signature.]

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