What: All Issues : Education, Humanities, & the Arts : General Education Funding : H. Con. Res. 36. Gay Rights/Military Recruitment/Vote Expressing Congress's Continued Support for Solomon Amendment-Law that Permits Withholding of Federal Funding from Universities Which, Due to the Military's Policy of Discriminating Against Gays and Lesbians, Do Not Permit Military Recruitment on Their Campuses. (2005 house Roll Call 16)
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H. Con. Res. 36. Gay Rights/Military Recruitment/Vote Expressing Congress's Continued Support for Solomon Amendment-Law that Permits Withholding of Federal Funding from Universities Which, Due to the Military's Policy of Discriminating Against Gays and Lesbians, Do Not Permit Military Recruitment on Their Campuses.
house Roll Call 16     Feb 02, 2005
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

In this vote, the House passed by overwhelming numbers a resolution expressing Congress's continued support for a law known as the Solomon Amendment, which permits the withholding of federal funds from universities who refuse to allow the U.S. military to recruit on their campuses. Some universities attempted to bar the military from recruiting on campus because the military's policy concerning gays and lesbians in the service violated the universities' nondiscrimination policies. The Solomon Amendment was passed to override these universities' actions. Republicans who, along with many Democrats, supported this resolution affirming the Solomon Amendment, asserted that it is critical that the military be able to recruit broadly and have access to all of the brightest, most capable young people to defend the country, particularly in a post-September 11 world and where the nation is presently at war. They maintained that if a university is not willing to allow the military access to help defend the country, then that university should be willing to forego federal funding. Progressives countered that universities should not be forced to permit a practice on their campuses that violates their own policies of nondiscrimination, and that it is the supporters of the military's policies on gays and lesbians who are depriving the U.S. military of access to as many "able-bodied people" as it would like to have in the service. (Barney Frank (D-MA).) H. Con. Res. 36 is a concurrent resolution, which is a statement expressing the intent or sentiment of Congress that must be passed by both houses, but does not require a presidential signature and does not have the force of law. The House passed this resolution by a vote of 327 to 84, thus expressing its continued support of a policy compelling universities to allow access to military recruiters.

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