What: All Issues : Education, Humanities, & the Arts : General Education Funding : Providing for consideration of a bill to authorize new grant programs for early-career scientists and engineers (H. Res. 318)/On adoption of the rules package (2007 house Roll Call 249)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

Providing for consideration of a bill to authorize new grant programs for early-career scientists and engineers (H. Res. 318)/On adoption of the rules package
house Roll Call 249     Apr 24, 2007
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote determined the rules for debate for an education bill to authorize new grant programs for early-career scientists and engineers, establish a new presidential science award, and create a new office to recommend funding for federal scientific research efforts.

Additionally, the legislation would require the National Science Foundation to allocate at least 3.5 percent of its research money to young-scientist programs.

The measure was proposed in response to a 2005 National Academies of Sciences report warning that without increased funding for math and science education, the United States would be likely to lose technology jobs to other nations.

This resolution outlined the rules for debate for the legislation, including how much floor time would be granted to each side and which amendments would be considered in order. The resolution is thus commonly known as the rules package.

Republicans opposed the rules package because the Democratic-controlled Rules Committee proposed what's known as a "structured rule," meaning that only the amendments pre-approved by the panel would get an up-or-down vote on the floor.

Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D-Calif.) pointed out that the rules package made in order all three amendments that were submitted for consideration to the Rules Committee.

Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.) nonetheless questioned "the need once again for a structured rule when an open rule could have been granted for consideration of this bill." So, despite his support for the underlying legislation, he urged his colleagues to oppose the rule.

Regardless of which party happens to be controlling the House, the majority often aims to control the number of amendments that can be offered on the floor (that weren't pre-approved by the Rules Committee) because such amendments take up floor time that detracts from the majority's ability to quickly move through its agenda.

Democrats were unanimous in their support for the rules package, and Republicans were unanimous in their opposition. Thus, on a completely party-line vote of 219 to 187, the House approved the rules for consideration for a bill to authorize new grant programs for early-career scientists and engineers. Despite their objections to the rules package, the vast majority of Republicans ended up voting in favor of the legislation itself, and it went on to pass easily.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name