What: All Issues : Education, Humanities, & the Arts : General Education Funding : A vote on passage of a Democratic amendment to the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res. 95) calling for fully funding President Bush's "Leave No Child Behind Act" in the new fiscal year by creating a reserve fund that would allow an increase of up to $8.6 billion in education programs, with the extra spending offset by rolling back a portion of President Bush's tax cuts for wealthy individuals. (2004 senate Roll Call 35)
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A vote on passage of a Democratic amendment to the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res. 95) calling for fully funding President Bush's "Leave No Child Behind Act" in the new fiscal year by creating a reserve fund that would allow an increase of up to $8.6 billion in education programs, with the extra spending offset by rolling back a portion of President Bush's tax cuts for wealthy individuals.
senate Roll Call 35     Mar 10, 2004
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

Senate progressives failed to advance an amendment to the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res. 95) that called for fully funding President Bush's "Leave No Child Behind Act" in the new fiscal year. The way in which Congress develops tax and spending legislation is guided by a set of specific procedures laid out in the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. Most importantly, the Budget Act calls for the annual development of a congressional "budget resolution." This resolution sets overarching limits on spending and on tax cuts that apply to legislation developed by individual committees - including the appropriations committees, tax-writing committees, and other committees that have jurisdiction over certain spending programs - as well as to any amendments offered to such legislation on the House or Senate floor. The amendment to fully fund the Leave No Child Behind Act, authored by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), also proclaimed it would lower the national debt by closing tax loopholes. It failed 46-52 almost exclusively along party lines. Specifically, Murray's amendment would have created a reserve fund that would allow an increase of up to $8.6 billion in education programs, directing that the extra spending be offset by revenue increases. Conservatives, labeling the plan as "another backdoor" attempt by Democrats to raise taxes, fought vigorously against the plan. "I want everybody to know this is a big spending increase in an area where we already have big spending increases -- enormous, if you go over the last few years," said Senate Budget Chairman Don Nickles (R-Okla.). "I want people to know this is a tax increase that is very large."

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