What: All Issues : War & Peace : Intelligence Agencies' Oversight : H.R. 2417. Fiscal 2004 Intelligence Authorization/Vote to Investigate Whether the Bush Administration Disclosed Erroneous Information to the Public to Justify War Against Iraq. (2003 house Roll Call 319)
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H.R. 2417. Fiscal 2004 Intelligence Authorization/Vote to Investigate Whether the Bush Administration Disclosed Erroneous Information to the Public to Justify War Against Iraq.
house Roll Call 319     Jun 26, 2003
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

One of the administration's main justifications for war with Iraq was the alleged existence of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in that country. In his State of the Union address to Congress and the nation, President Bush cited military intelligence that Iraq had an extensive chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons program. The intelligence included in the State of the Union address even identified specific locations in Iraq where stockpiles of biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons were stored. After months of searching for those weapons, however, U.S. inspectors have been unable to uncover any WMD in Iraq. In response, Representative Kucinich (D-OH) and others accused the administration of misleading the public about the dangers of Iraq's weapons program to the U.S. in order to justify war against Iraq. In Kucinich's words, "the CIA disseminated unreliable, raw, untrue information about Iraq's alleged threat to the United States." In an effort investigate the administration's intelligence-gathering activities prior to the Iraqi war, Congressman Kucinich offered an amendment to a bill to authorize funding for the CIA and other intelligence agencies which would have audited all telephone and electronic communications between the CIA and the office of Vice President Cheney on the subject of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction in order to determine what evidence there was for the invasion. Progressives supported Kucinich's plan because, in their view, the public has a right to know if the administration disclosed intelligence which had previously been discredited by the U.S. intelligence establishment. Solid majorities from both parties voted against the Kucinich proposal and the measure was rejected 76-347.

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