What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : Corporate Tax Breaks, General : H. Con. Res. 393. Fiscal 2005 Budget Resolution/Vote on the Blue Dog Democrats' Version of the Budget Resolution Which Would Balance the Budget by 2012 and Prevent the Passage of Additional Tax Cuts Until Congress and the President Had Taken Action to Reduce the Deficit. (2004 house Roll Call 89)
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H. Con. Res. 393. Fiscal 2005 Budget Resolution/Vote on the Blue Dog Democrats' Version of the Budget Resolution Which Would Balance the Budget by 2012 and Prevent the Passage of Additional Tax Cuts Until Congress and the President Had Taken Action to Reduce the Deficit.
house Roll Call 89     Mar 25, 2004
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

The purpose of the congressional budget process-and specifically the budget resolution-is to set an overall financial blueprint early in the congressional session to guide future spending decisions in the House and Senate on appropriations bills, tax legislation, and changes to mandatory spending programs such as Social Security and Medicare. While a budget resolution is non-binding and Congress is not required to stay within its limits, the majority party gains procedural protections during future debates on spending legislation if those measures stay within the budget caps set in the budget resolution (budget resolutions, it should be noted, are drafted by the White House but require congressional approval). Often, however, alternative budget resolutions which reflect the priorities of factions within the majority or minority party are drafted and debated on the House floor. The subject of this vote was a budget resolution drafted by "Blue Dog" Democrats, a coalition of self-described conservative and moderate Democrats who advocate for fiscal responsibility within the House. If adopted, the Blue Dog budget resolution would have provided for a balanced budget by 2012, cut the deficit in half over the next two years, prevented the passage of additional tax cuts until Congress and the president had taken action to reduce the deficit, and restored pay-as-you-go (PAYGO) rules to tax cut legislation in order to insure that revenue losses caused by tax cuts were restored by spending cuts or revenue increases in other areas of the budget. Progressives supported the Blue Dog budget resolution as a fiscally responsible alternative to the Republican version. The Republican version of the budget resolution, Progressives argued, contained what they characterized as an excessive amount of tax cuts and an inadequate amount of funding to reduce the budget deficit. Progressives argued that after three years of tax cutting by Congress and the White House-tax cutting which has contributed to record high budget deficits and an additional $1.2 trillion to the nation's debt-it was now time to restore some fiscal discipline in government. Conservatives voted against the Blue Dog budget resolution on the grounds that it failed to provide enough tax cuts, domestic spending reductions, and funding increases to the military. On a vote of 183-243, the Blue Dog budget resolution was struck down and the spending priorities contained within it were not incorporated into the Republican version of the budget resolution.

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