What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : HR 4775. 2002 Supplemental Appropriations/Procedural Vote Intended to Force Republican Leaders to Consider Politically-Unpopular Debt Limit Increase As Standalone Measure. (2002 house Roll Call 196)
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HR 4775. 2002 Supplemental Appropriations/Procedural Vote Intended to Force Republican Leaders to Consider Politically-Unpopular Debt Limit Increase As Standalone Measure.
house Roll Call 196     May 22, 2002
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

The September 11th terrorist attacks left the federal government in need of additional spending, which Congress debated in the form of a supplemental appropriations bill. The main text of the bill was broadly popular, but House Republicans decided to use this popularity to pass a number of unrelated provisions, which they attached to the larger bill. Two of these were particularly galling to Progressives. The first adopted a low spending limit for the upcoming 2003 appropriations that Progressives-and even many Republicans-said was inadequate to meet the government's needs. The second provision prevented the House from casting an up-or-down vote on raising the government's debt ceiling. Everyone agreed the debt ceiling had to be raised, but Progressives and all Democrats wanted a vote on that issue alone so they could call attention to what they viewed as the damaging effects of the president's $1.35 trillion tax cut of 2001. Obey (D-WI) decided to wage a war of delay in the hope of tying up House business so thoroughly that the Republican leadership would be forced to permit a separate vote on the debt ceiling. This motion to rise from the Committee of the Whole was one of many votes designed to stretch out the debate on the supplemental appropriations bill, possibly into the upcoming week-long recess for lawmakers. Progressives voted for the measure, which served its delaying purpose even though it did not pass. The final vote on the motion was 134-250.

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