What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Insuring Government Has Adequate Financing to Function : H.J. Res. 112. Fiscal 2003 Continuing Appropriations/Vote to Allow Consideration of a Bill to Fund Government at Previous Year's Levels Rather than Find Compromise Solution on New Spending Priorities. (2002 house Roll Call 438)
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H.J. Res. 112. Fiscal 2003 Continuing Appropriations/Vote to Allow Consideration of a Bill to Fund Government at Previous Year's Levels Rather than Find Compromise Solution on New Spending Priorities.
house Roll Call 438     Oct 03, 2002
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

Every year, Congress must enact thirteen appropriations bill in order to fund government agencies and programs. If agreement cannot be reached among lawmakers on funding levels for the upcoming fiscal year (which begins on October 1st of each calendar year), a continuing resolution (or CR) must be adopted to extend appropriations from the prior fiscal year into the future (under a CR, federal departments and programs are funded at the previous year's level). If agreement cannot be reached on a CR, the government is shut down; this situation occurred in 1995 when congressional Republicans and President Clinton could not reach agreement on the appropriations bills. In late-2002, the legislative calendar was jammed with resolutions to authorize the use of force in Iraq and provide additional funding for homeland security; as a result, only five of the thirteen appropriations bills for 2003 funding had passed the House as of October 3, 2002. The subject of this vote was a motion to move the previous question (thereby ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on a continuing resolution which would extend funding for government agencies and programs until October 11, 2002 that were due to expire under a previously adopted CR. During House debate, Progressives raised concerns with the approach of continuously adopting CR's to keep the government functioning because current spending needs (i.e. 2003 and not 2002) are not reflected in the resolutions (those resolutions are based on 2002 funding levels). Moreover, Progressives argued that continuously debating and adopting CR's on a week-to-week basis would hinder Congress's ability to deal with important legislative items such as the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education appropriations bill. The motion to move the previous question was passed on a 206-198 vote and the continuing resolution was subsequently adopted by an overwhelming 404-7 vote margin.

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