What: All Issues : War & Peace : War with Iraq : H.R. 3289. Fiscal 2004 Supplemental Appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan/Vote on Final Passage of a $87.5 Billion Conference Report for Supplemental Spending on Military and Reconstruction Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. (2003 house Roll Call 601)
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H.R. 3289. Fiscal 2004 Supplemental Appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan/Vote on Final Passage of a $87.5 Billion Conference Report for Supplemental Spending on Military and Reconstruction Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
house Roll Call 601     Oct 30, 2003
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

The subject of this vote was final passage of a conference report on the Bush Administration's $87.5 billion supplemental spending request to Congress-the largest supplemental request in U.S. history-for costs associated with military and reconstruction operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The supplemental spending package included $18.6 billion in grants for Iraq's reconstruction, $1.2 billion in grants for the reconstruction of Afghanistan, and $65.8 billion for military operations, weapons procurement, and military construction projects in those two countries. Conservatives voted in favor of final passage based on their support for U.S. military operations in Iraq and the need to provide funding for those operations as quickly as possible. Progressives opposed the legislation on a number of grounds. First, they argued, U.S. taxpayers were shouldering too heavy a burden for military and reconstruction operations in Iraq. In their view, President Bush's "go-it-alone" strategy had needlessly alienated potential allies who would have been inclined to help the U.S.-either financially or militarily or both-during both the Iraqi conflict and the post-war reconstruction. Second, Progressives argued that insufficient funding was included in the supplemental bill to protect the lives and health of U.S. troops. Only twenty percent of U.S. personnel had access to clean drinking water, they argued, and many front-line soldiers lacked basic combat necessities such as body armor. Third, Progressives were concerned that the Bush Administration lacked a clear policy for Iraq's post-war reconstruction and transition to democracy. Despite these objections by Progressives, the conference report on the supplemental spending bill was adopted on a vote of 298-121 and the measure was signed into law by President Bush on November 6, 2003.

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