What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : (H.R. 5116) Legislation authorizing $86 billion to be spent over six years on research intended to make the U.S. more competitive in the world, including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill (2010 house Roll Call 259)
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(H.R. 5116) Legislation authorizing $86 billion to be spent over six years on research intended to make the U.S. more competitive in the world, including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill
house Roll Call 259     May 12, 2010
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Win

This was a vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to legislation authorizing $86 billion to be spent over six years on research intended to make the U.S. more competitive in the world, including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research. Of the $86 billion total, $44 billion would be designated for National Science Foundation programs, while $35 billion would be designated for Energy Department research programs. The bill also authorized $5.4 billion for National Institute of Standards and Technology programs. (The National Institute of Standards and Technology is an agency within the Commerce Department. Its mission to promote competitiveness through scientific and technological research.)

Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-CO) urged support for the resolution and the underlying legislation: “As we speak, there are scientists, inventors, and engineers in our Nation who are devising the next groundbreaking advances. We cannot afford to let those ideas wither on the vine. So I urge the passage of the rule and the underlying bill, which will create jobs and solidify the foundation for the long-term growth and prosperity of the United States.”

Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL) argued that the bill would provide for excessive spending on scientific research programs: “…We need to have an economic strategy that encourages companies, businesses in the United States, to compete, to grow, and to hire new workers, a strategy that includes the streamlining of burdensome regulations, a strategy that reduces taxation, that brings our federal spending under control, and controls the spiraling national debt…as much as I would prefer to support the underlying legislation, I believe that at this time of severe budgetary constraints, the underlying legislation includes excessive spending levels.”

The House agreed to the resolution by a vote of 243-177. 243 Democrats voted “yea.” All 172 Republicans present and 5 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to formal floor debate on legislation authorizing $86 billion to be spent over six years on research intended to make the U.S. more competitive in the world, including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research.

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