What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Immigration Law Reform : (H. Res. 1752) On a resolution allowing the House to bring up a “rule” setting a time limit for debate and limiting amendments -- to all legislation considered in the House of Representatives until December 18 -- on the same day it was passed by the House Rules Committee. This resolution was intended to expedite consideration of major legislation, including a bill extending expiring income tax cuts; legislation implementing stricter food safety regulations; a bill providing annual funding for the Defense Department; and legislation allowing children (who were not born in the U.S.) of illegal immigrants to remain in the country legally. (2010 house Roll Call 615)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

(H. Res. 1752) On a resolution allowing the House to bring up a “rule” setting a time limit for debate and limiting amendments -- to all legislation considered in the House of Representatives until December 18 -- on the same day it was passed by the House Rules Committee. This resolution was intended to expedite consideration of major legislation, including a bill extending expiring income tax cuts; legislation implementing stricter food safety regulations; a bill providing annual funding for the Defense Department; and legislation allowing children (who were not born in the U.S.) of illegal immigrants to remain in the country legally.
house Roll Call 615     Dec 08, 2010
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Win

This was a vote on a resolution allowing the House to bring up a “rule” setting a time limit for debate and limiting amendments -- to all legislation considered in the House of Representatives until December 18 -- on the same day it was passed by the House Rules Committee.

According to procedural rules in the House, passage of a rule on the same day that the rule was passed by the Rules Committee requires a two-thirds majority vote rather than a simple majority vote. In an effort to circumvent the two-thirds majority requirement for “same-day” consideration of a rule, Democratic leaders brought up a resolution that would waive that requirement and allow the rule to be passed by a simple majority.

This vote took place on December 8, 2010, less than one month before the end of this congressional session. Any bill not passed by both houses of Congress (and signed into law by the president) by the end of a congressional session automatically dies. Thus, Democrats used this “same-day rule” to expedite consideration of major legislation which had still not cleared both houses of Congress.

Democrats indicated that this resolution would allow the House to bring up major legislation, including a bill to extending expiring income tax cuts; legislation implementing stricter food safety regulations; a bill providing annual funding for the Defense Department; and legislation allowing children (who were not born in the U.S.) of illegal immigrants to remain in the country legally.

Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) urged support for the “same day rule“ resolution: “ Today…key legislation remains to be completed…This rule today is critical so that we can move forward to consider middle class tax cuts, the DREAM Act, food safety, defense authorization [the Defense spending bill], regardless of where members of this body stand on particular issues, and I think we owe it to our country to bring them forward in a timely manner for full consideration by this body.”

Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL) urged opposition to the measure: “The rule before us provides for expedited same day consideration for all legislation brought forward until December 18….It's really martial law rule because it closes down the process, does not allow members of Congress to review legislation, to really know what legislation that will be considered is about.”

The House agreed to this “same-day rule” by a vote of 215-194. 215 Democrats – including a majority of progressives – voted “yea.” 167 Republicans and 27 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House agreed to a resolution allowing the House to bring up a rule setting a time limit for debate and limiting amendments to major legislation, including bills to extend expiring tax cuts, provide annual funding for the Defense Department, impose new food safety regulations, and allow children (who were not born in the U.S.) of illegal immigrants to remain in the country legally.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name