What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Equal Access to the Airwaves/Broadcast Media : (H.R. 1076) Legislation eliminating all federal funding for National Public Radio – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and prohibiting amendments to the bill (2011 house Roll Call 190)
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(H.R. 1076) Legislation eliminating all federal funding for National Public Radio – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and prohibiting amendments to the bill
house Roll Call 190     Mar 17, 2011
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

This was a vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and prohibiting amendments to legislation eliminating all federal funding for National Public Radio (NPR). Republicans had long viewed NPR--which received federal funding through the Corporation for Public Broadcasting—as harboring a liberal bias. After Republicans regained control of the House of Representatives following the 2010 midterm elections, they drafted legislation to cut off all federal funds for the organization.

Rep. Richard Nugent (R-FL) urged support for the resolution and the underlying bill: “We're not closing down local radio stations. We're actually giving them the ability to liberate themselves from federal dollars. My good friends on the other side of the aisle continue to refuse to prioritize about what's important for America. They continue on a path of just spend, because all programs are inherently good. While you've heard a lot of us like NPR in regard to certain programming, there's others that we do not….I can't in good conscience support continuing to fund NPR with tax dollars. A large number of Americans fundamentally disagree with the content and mission of NPR. Moreover, this is a program that can be privately funded.”

Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT) opposed the resolution: “…Why have a proposal that destroys institutions? Vermont Public Radio is the link between 251 towns, cities, and villages in the state of Vermont. Farmers listen to it in their barns. Parents listen to it on their way to bringing their kids to school. People at work listen to it for the weather reports, and it welds together the political discussion in the state of Vermont which is vibrant, which is varied, which has people with different points of view having a common reference point. Public radio is an institution that allows democracy to thrive.”

The House agreed to this resolution by a vote of 236-181. All 235 Republicans present and 1 Democrat voted “yea.” 181 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to formal floor debate on legislation eliminating all federal funding for National Public Radio.

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