What: All Issues : Justice for All: Civil and Criminal : S. 1054. Tax Reductions/Procedural Vote to Defeat an Amendment Designed to Limit Attorney Fees in Tobacco Settlements and Thereby Discourage Highly-Skilled Attorneys From Mounting Legal Challenges Against the Tobacco Industry. (2003 senate Roll Call 161)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

S. 1054. Tax Reductions/Procedural Vote to Defeat an Amendment Designed to Limit Attorney Fees in Tobacco Settlements and Thereby Discourage Highly-Skilled Attorneys From Mounting Legal Challenges Against the Tobacco Industry.
senate Roll Call 161     May 15, 2003
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win

During Senate debate on legislation to reduce taxes, Senator Jon Kyl (R-AZ) proposed a measure to limit attorney fees on tobacco settlements that exceed $100 million to an amount valued at five times the lawyer's hourly rate. Progressives opposed Kyl's amendment because it could potentially discourage well-qualified and highly-skilled attorneys from mounting legal challenges to the tobacco industry and other powerful industries whose victims can only afford lawyers on a contingency basis. Senator John Breaux (D-LA) raised a point of order against the Kyl proposal by arguing that it was not relevant to the tax cut measure under consideration. Debate on budget-related legislation-which, according to recent rulings by the Senate parliamentarian, includes legislation to cut taxes-is governed by reconciliation rules set forth in the Budget Act of 1974. Those rules allow Senators to raise points of order against amendments by claiming that they are not relevant to the pending legislation in order to defeat the amendment. To overcome a point of order, a sixty-vote majority is required in support of the measure. The Kyl amendment failed to attract the necessary sixty votes and was rejected by a 37-61 margin.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name