What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : More Equitable Distribution of Tax Burden : S. 1054. Tax Reductions/Procedural Vote to Defeat a Substitute Measure Designed to Stimulate the Economy by Reducing the Tax Burden on Low-Income Taxpayers and Retaining the Highest Marginal Income Tax Rate for Wealthy Individuals. (2003 senate Roll Call 168)
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S. 1054. Tax Reductions/Procedural Vote to Defeat a Substitute Measure Designed to Stimulate the Economy by Reducing the Tax Burden on Low-Income Taxpayers and Retaining the Highest Marginal Income Tax Rate for Wealthy Individuals.
senate Roll Call 168     May 15, 2003
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

Senator Mark Dayton (D-MN) proposed a economic recovery plan to the tax-cut legislation which would have tripled the amount of income subject to the 10% tax rate (thereby decreasing the tax burden on low-income individuals) and maintained the highest marginal tax rate at 39.6% (rather then reducing that rate as set forth in the GOP-version). The cost of Dayton's proposal would be offset by restoring the dividends tax which is eliminated in the Republican tax cut legislation (dividends are corporate payouts to shareholders). Progressives voted in favor of Dayton's measure because, in their view, tax breaks should be targeted toward lower income individuals rather than wealthy taxpayers. A point of order was raised against the Dayton proposal by Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA) on the grounds that it was not relevant to the tax cut measure under consideration. Debate on budget-related legislation-which, according to recent rulings by the Senate parliamentarian, includes proposals to cut taxes-is governed by reconciliation rules in accordance with the Budget Act of 1974. Those rules allow Senators to raise points of order against amendments by claiming that they are not relevant to the pending legislation in order to sink the amendment. To overcome a point of order, a sixty-vote majority is required in support of the legislation. The Dayton plan failed to attract the necessary sixty-votes and was defeated 44-56.

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