What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Insuring Government Has Adequate Financing to Function : A vote on a Republican motion to cut off Democratic debate and bring up for a vote an Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) that would extend the current federal Internet tax moratorium by another four years. (2004 senate Roll Call 75)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

A vote on a Republican motion to cut off Democratic debate and bring up for a vote an Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) that would extend the current federal Internet tax moratorium by another four years.
senate Roll Call 75     Apr 29, 2004
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

Progressives unsuccessfully sought to block Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) from filing "cloture" (a procedural move designed to limit debate on a measure and allow it to be voted upon) on his Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) on the grounds it would harm states. S. 150, sponsored by McCain, would extend the current federal Internet tax moratorium, meaning states will not be able to levy taxes on Internet transactions for four years from passage of the bill. S. 150 also would prohibit two or more states from taxing the same online purchase and would bar taxes that specifically target Internet commerce. Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture, and McCain's motion was agreed to 64-34. Conservatives, whose preference is a permanent tax moratorium on Internet transactions, nonetheless backed McCain's four-year moratorium as a compromise. When Congress passed the first tax moratorium on Internet access in 1998, lawmakers said such a move was crucial to fostering the growth of online commerce and was consistent with a "hands off" approach to regulating the new technology. However, progressives in opposing S. 150 argued that state and local governments are now more desperate for revenue, and as such, progressives said, certain states should to be exempt from the Internet taxation ban for an additional period of time. However, this crucial vote on cloture effectively closed off that option for those states, and the Senate went on to pass S. 150 93-3.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name