What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Insuring Government Has Adequate Financing to Function : A vote to table (kill) a Democratic amendment to the Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) extending to Nov. 1, 2007 a current federal ban on three types of taxes relating to the Internet. (2004 senate Roll Call 76)
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A vote to table (kill) a Democratic amendment to the Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) extending to Nov. 1, 2007 a current federal ban on three types of taxes relating to the Internet.
senate Roll Call 76     Apr 29, 2004
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

The Internet anti-taxation bill (S. 150) would extend until Nov. 1, 2007, a current federal ban on three types of taxes relating to the Internet, including 1)those placed on Internet access; 2)taxes that were higher for products bought over the Internet than items bought in a store or through a catalog; and 3)multiple taxes, where more than one state imposed a sales tax on an electronic commerce transaction. It also would require states to stop taxing Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL), cable modems and other Internet broadband services after Nov. 1, 2005. An amendment to S. 150 offered by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) would have extended an exemption from the bill's provisions to four years for states and localities that already tax consumer digital subscriber line (DSL) services. Her amendment also would extend the Internet tax moratorium for four years. Said Feinstein, "The bottom line is that an extension of the ban on Internet access taxes is important, and I believe we were able to do this in a way that protects our cities and their ability to provide basic services," she said. Specifically, her amendment would widen the legislation's exemptions to allow 17 states that already tax high speed digital subscriber lines to levy those taxes for another four years, since those states have become dependant on the revenue from those taxes. However, progressives failed to counter a motion offered by Senate Commerce Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.) to table (kill) Feinstein's amendment. Feinstein's amendment was tabled on a 59-37 vote, meaning the 17 states she sought to exempt for four years from the tax moratorium would have two years to phase out their DSL taxes under S. 150. Conservatives, who back banning taxation of Internet access permanently, said Feinstein's proposal would harm the expansion of Internet commerce whereas tax exemptions will encourage investment in broadband networks.

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