What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : On passage of a Democratic amendment to S. 2400, the fiscal year 2005 Defense Department authorization measure, designed to ensure the costs of the U.S. missions in Iraq and Afghanistan are realistically represented and accounted for by rolling back a portion of President Bush's tax cuts for individuals earning more than $1 million per year. (2004 senate Roll Call 130)
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On passage of a Democratic amendment to S. 2400, the fiscal year 2005 Defense Department authorization measure, designed to ensure the costs of the U.S. missions in Iraq and Afghanistan are realistically represented and accounted for by rolling back a portion of President Bush's tax cuts for individuals earning more than $1 million per year.
senate Roll Call 130     Jun 17, 2004
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Loss

Progressives backed Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) on this amendment to S. 2400, the fiscal year 2005 Defense Department authorization measure before the Senate, calling it a "simple and straightforward" proposal designed to ensure the costs of the U.S. missions in Iraq and Afghanistan are realistically represented and accounted for. Biden said the bottom line of his amendment "says we should stop borrowing to cover the cost of our missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. If this mission is as important as the president says it is ... then we should pay for it." Biden said his amendment was relevant because relates to finding the money to pay for the $25 billion asked for in the Defense authorization by the president. To do this, Biden's amendment would have provided that the top income tax rate be increased from 35 percent to 36 percent starting in 2005 until 2010, and that the resulting funds made available by the increase be used to pay for security and stabilization. In other words, in the year 2005, the tax cuts slated by the Bush administration or the wealthiest one percent of Americans (those earning more than $1 million per year) would be suspended by one percent. Said Biden, "I can't fathom a single one of these people not having enough patriotic instinct to say: No, no, no, no, I am unwilling. I am unwilling to pay, in the year 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010, 1 percent more than I would otherwise have to pay." Biden's amendment was rejected 44-53 by the full Senate, with conservatives arguing against raising taxes. "The amendment simply raises taxes for more spending," with no guarantee it would be put toward the war effort, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) asserted, in rejecting Biden's proposal.

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