What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Adequate Government Funding for a Broad Range of Human Needs : S Con Res 70. (Fiscal 2009 budget resolution) Bunning of Kentucky amendment that would allow for future legislation to repeal an increase in Social Security income tax benefits without increasing the deficit/On agreeing to the amendment (2008 senate Roll Call 52)
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S Con Res 70. (Fiscal 2009 budget resolution) Bunning of Kentucky amendment that would allow for future legislation to repeal an increase in Social Security income tax benefits without increasing the deficit/On agreeing to the amendment
senate Roll Call 52     Mar 13, 2008
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote was on an amendment by Jim Bunning, R-Ky., that would modify the fiscal 2009 budget resolution to make room for future legislation to repeal the 1993 tax increase on Social Security benefits.  Unlike an amendment adopted earlier that Bunning criticized, Bunning’s amendment would make up for the loss in revenue by cutting the amount of money Congress can spend this year across the board.

The amendment was offered to the fiscal 2009 budget resolution, which outlines Congress’ spending priorities for the year and other budgetary rules.


“This time it is paid for, not like the last one we voted on,” Bunning said.  “This is the real cut of taxes for senior citizens. The last one was a ‘cover some part of your body’ rather than the real kind of tax cut.”

“Mr. President, there are real cuts, the Senator is right about that. This would cut, across the board by $21 billion, education, veterans’ health, homeland security, law enforcement. If you want to do that, vote for the Bunning amendment,” countered Kent Conrad, D-N.D.

By a vote of 47-53, the amendment was defeated.  All but two Republicans present voted for the amendment (Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe of Maine).  Every Democrat present voted against the amendment.  The end result is that the bill went forward without language that would have repealed the 1993 tax increase on Social Security benefits, offset by an across the board cut in congressional spending.

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