What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : HR 1105. (Fiscal 2009 spending) McCain of Arizona amendment that would prohibit funds from going to member projects not listed in the bill’s text/On agreeing to the amendment (2009 senate Roll Call 86)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

HR 1105. (Fiscal 2009 spending) McCain of Arizona amendment that would prohibit funds from going to member projects not listed in the bill’s text/On agreeing to the amendment
senate Roll Call 86     Mar 09, 2009
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote was on an amendment by John McCain, R-Ariz., that would prohibit funds in the bill from going to member pet projects (often called “earmarks”) unless those projects were listed in the text of the spending bill, rather than the “managers statement” that typically accompanies the bill.  This amendment would have the effect of not allowing earmarks, since they are typically not listed in the actual bill text.  The amendment was offered to the bill that funds most domestic agencies for fiscal 2009.

McCain, who has made part of his political career by campaigning against earmarks, said Congress has allowed them to grow unabated over the years; he said in 1991 there were just over 500 earmarks, as opposed to nearly 9,000 in this bill.

“Most Americans would say: Why don’t you have what you want to spend in the bill itself? So far, obviously, the answer has been that this has just grown and grown over the years, as earmarks have grown over the years. And let me just also point out, there is an attempt to say: Look, we have always done this. This has always been the case. So we are just doing what we have always done. You know, the fact is, Mr. President, we haven’t always done this,” McCain said.

Carl Levin, D-Mich., said McCain’s amendment would not reduce spending.  It would prohibit that spending from going to earmarks, but it would not have any fiscal impact otherwise.

“The money would be appropriated and available to be spent as the executive branch sees fit. So voting for this amendment thinking it will reduce spending would be a vote cast on a false assumption,” Levin said. 

By a vote of 32-63, the amendment was rejected.  Of Republicans present, 28 voted for the amendment and 10 voted against it.  All but four Democrats present voted against the amendment.  The end result is that an amendment that would have effectively prohibited earmarks in a fiscal 2009 spending bill was rejected.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name