What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Bennett of Utah amendment that would allow for a reduction in future spending equal to the amount of money spent by the 2009 economic stimulus law/On agreeing to the amendment (2009 senate Roll Call 143)
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S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Bennett of Utah amendment that would allow for a reduction in future spending equal to the amount of money spent by the 2009 economic stimulus law/On agreeing to the amendment
senate Roll Call 143     Apr 02, 2009
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote was on an amendment by Robert Bennett, R-Utah, that would allow for a reduction in future spending caps equal to the amount of money spent by the 2009 economic stimulus law after the economy is projected to recover.  Bennett said this would mean $150 billion in savings.  The amendment was offered was offered to the budget resolution that serves as the blueprint for Congress’ budget priorities in fiscal 2010.  The budget resolution sets overall spending targets for the Appropriations committees and outlines other budget rules.

Bennett said his amendment would remove economic stimulus-related spending allocations from the budget resolution’s future spending estimates because “it seems to me we do not need to fund the same things twice.” 

“By reducing the proposed spending amounts in the budget resolution, Congress will be recognizing that we have already passed money to spend in that area. For those who say, yes, but the stimulus is different, we are all hoping that the need for stimulus will be passed by the time we get to 2014 and it will not be stimulative but, rather, inflationary. It is for that reason that I offer the amendment,” Bennett said.

Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said Bennett’s amendment would have the effect of eliminating 20 percent of the stimulus law passed just weeks prior.

“The Senator’s amendment would cut defense by over $2 billion, would cut veterans by over $400 million, would cut areas in education, health, and infrastructure.  If there is one thing that united this body, it was investments in infrastructure, much of what would be cut under this amendment,” Conrad said.

The budget resolution’s future-year estimates are not binding, particularly since Congress passes a new budget resolution each year, but they do serve as information about how much money Congress expects to be spending in future years.

By a vote of 42-56, the amendment was rejected.  Every Republican present voted for the amendment.  All but one Democrat present voted against the amendment.  The end result is that the measure went forward without language that would have deleted $150 billion in stimulus-related funding from future spending estimates in the fiscal 2010 budget resolution.

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