What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : H Con Res 321. (Adjournment) On adopting a resolution providing for the House and Senate to adjourn until Nov. 15, 2010, after the congressional mid-term elections are over/On passing the bill (2010 senate Roll Call 248)
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H Con Res 321. (Adjournment) On adopting a resolution providing for the House and Senate to adjourn until Nov. 15, 2010, after the congressional mid-term elections are over/On passing the bill
senate Roll Call 248     Sep 29, 2010
Progressive Position:
Yea
Progressive Result:
Win

This vote was on whether to adopt a resolution allowing the House and Senate to adjourn between September 30, 2010, through Nov. 15, 2010, after the mid-term congressional elections have concluded.  The House and Senate both decided to temporarily adjourn so that lawmakers could return to their home states and districts to campaign.

No one spoke either for or against the adjournment resolution, which is typically a routine matter approved without any contention.  However, Republicans had been angry that Democrats refused to bring up for a vote legislation to extend the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts enacted under the George W. Bush administration. 

Most Republicans want all of the tax cuts extended at the least, or even made permanent.  Many Democrats, meanwhile, support extending some of the tax cuts for the middle class, while letting them expire for those making significant amounts of money ($250,000 annually is usually put forward as the cut-off point).

The Democratic leadership had been open to bringing the matter up for a vote prior to recessing for campaign season, but many rank and file Democrats – who are often more vulnerable than long-time incumbents – opposed having a pre-election vote on the tax cuts because they were worried about repercussions at the ballot box. Republicans, particularly in the House, sought to paint the adjournment vote as tantamount to voting no on extending the tax cuts.

By a vote of 54-39, the adjournment resolution was adopted.  All but two Democrats present voted to adjourn.  All but one Republican present voted against adjourning.  The end result is that the Senate voted to adjourn until Nov. 15, 2010.

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